Posts in Ask the butcher
Ask the Butcher: New York Strip Steak

The New York Strip ranks among the best-known beef steaks, finding a home in traditional steakhouses alongside the ribeye, filet mignon, Porterhouse and T-bone. What most steak eaters may not realize, however, is the extremely close relationship between the New York strip (known, like most other steaks, by almost a dozen other names around the country and world) and all four of those other familiar favorites.

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Ask the Butcher: Skirt Steak

As we’ve discussed in our pieces on the loin and rib primals, the area of the steer between the fifth rib and the hind-end of the tenderloin is primarily split into two sectors: 1) the area lining the backbone which produces organized, pricy steaks, and 2) the belly area, comprised of fibrous, messy muscles that carry big flavors and cheaper prices. The skirt steak is in the latter category, working its life away supporting the massive viscera (again four stomachs) of the animal.

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Ask the Butcher: Beef Ribs

You may have seen the giant, dinosaur-like beef ribs skyrocketing in popularity in Central Texas barbecue, and a at a hefty price (often more than $20/lb), you may have tasted the beefiest, butteriest, most succulent bite of smoked beef money can buy. Unlike pork ribs, beef rib meat doesn’t have a safety layer of moist fat to baste the meat as it cooks, so the cook is tasked with maintaining or augmenting whatever moisture is present to keep the ribs from drying out. Read: bring our the slow cookers.

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Your New Favorite Cut: What's a Bavette?

When we’re finished ensuring that our meat comes from the highest-quality humane ranches in Central Texas, our curiosity remains, and that’s when we start to seek out the tasty cuts not always available from the local butcher shop. Today we’ll take a look at the bavette (known by several other names, as we’ll discuss), a meaty, flavorful cut from the sirloin that plays a great alternative to flank steak and an upgrade from the skirt.

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8-Piece Thanksgiving Turkey: Take the Stress out of the Turkey Cook

If there must be turkey on your family’s Thanksgiving table, but the idea of using up family time to take care of a roasting bird isn’t up your alley, try breaking down the bird into smaller pieces prior to seasoning and cooking. Smaller chunks of meat means simpler and faster preparation, and the ease of use with the individual pieces invites personal culinary creativity by making each step just that much less bulky.

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Flat Iron Steak: the Origin of a Delicious (and elusive) Cut

Flat iron steaks are a team favorite at Rosso & Flynn because the tenderness and flavor are hard to beat. But where did the flat iron steak come from? It is a difficult cut to find in the grocery store or even most butcher shops. Our butcher, Michael, explains where it comes from and why it is considered an artisanal butcher's cut. 

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Guide to Brines

If you brined your thanksgiving turkey, you know brining can be the difference between a flavorful, juicy turkey and dry, lack-luster bird. But brining is for more than just once a year. Here are some ideas for different brines and methods.

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Ask the butcherlisa flynn